Blink

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One of the best parts of a group book discussion is what is learned from others who are at the discussion. Someone else may express a point that you didn’t think about or missed, adding to the value of the meetup. It’s also great when new people are introduced and to find out their impressions. Tonight, five of us (with one who was brand new!) sat in a circle of chairs in the back part of the Michigan News Agency (in Kalamazoo, MI). Our discussion revolved around the book “Blink” by Malcolm Gladwell.

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Anything by Gladwell is bound to be controversial. In fact, one point near the beginning of tonight’s discussion was that Gladwell is trying to increase his credibility in the scientific community through the examples he provides. Much of this book (and many of his books) may seem redundant since he actually only has a few points, and then lots of examples. Overall, for “Blink,” the consensus of the four of us who read it was that the stories weaved the points together well throughout the book.

The concept behind blink is that the subconscious mind processes more than the conscious mind, leading to a history of stored experience. It is that history that makes what seems like a spontaneous and random reaction actually not random. The question is: “When is it good to use that “intuition” or “gut feeling” for a quick decision and when is it better to take time and research through a lengthier decision process?”

To go along with the previous questions, we discussed the following points:

  • Basketball is an example of needing more analysis since everything on the court cannot be experienced.
  • Editing data vs filtering data and the fact that sometimes “less is more.”
  • Analytic vs intuitive in the military and war games examples.
  • Why entrepreneurs have to make snap decisions most of the time.

Some other points that we discussed:

  • Pepsi vs Coke and why New Coke evolved in the first place (do you know?)
  • How the packaging, environment, and previous experience of a product effect the taste, plus wondering if this idea also effects the wine tasting experience.
  • The jam story and the relation to the regret decision theory, where more choices means being regretful for what wasn’t chosen. For example, more jam was sold when there were only 6 choices compared to 24. Is this why restaurant menu choices are getting smaller?
  • Why tryouts for orchestras have screens.
  • Why Warren Harding was chosen for (the worst) President ever, and the question of how we vote today – if it is by sound bytes, how is that different than Harding being chosen because of his “presidential look?”

Probably one of the most important points was priming, and how we associate what we do, and even why many self-help books include affirmation and other reinforcement statements. If you want to check out the test that is used for an experiment, click here for the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and comment below on your thoughts from the results.

Happy reading!

Stacy (a.k.a “The Book Lady”)

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3 Comments

Filed under 2014, KBBC Choices (by year)

3 responses to “Blink

  1. Stacy, the idea of guest hosting is interesting. However, instead of a random process, it might be a good idea to have people sign up for the month they want to host. This way a person can avoid hosting in a busy month or a month that they know that they will not be able to attend.

  2. Pingback: Book Club Turns Two | Kalamazoo Business Book Club (KBBC)

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